There war for water is not on the way – it’s already here

I had the honor of participating (and repping Circle of Hope) at the Standing Rock March on Washington last Friday along with Kristen and Joby. The rally that ensued was the most inspired and well-led that I’ve ever attended. One of the main MC’s was 16yr old Xiuhtezcatl Martinez (pronounced Shoe-TEZ-Caht) who youth directs Earth Guardians and lives as a climate change activist and hip hop emcee. He has a TED talk. He typified the vibe of the speakers and musicians, who each shared briefly. Everyone began with gratitude. Most people thanked our Creator and the elders and ancestors who protected the waters for us, inspiring us to protect for those yet to come. 

Last week’s Delaware River Basin Commission’s business meeting was postponed due to inclement weather. I attended the open forum by a member of the commission last month where they heard public comment on new proposals – one a pipeline extension through our watershed and the other a new fracking site – that would bring an end to the hard-won moratorium on fracking. Since then, the commission has not undergone the research they said was needed to make a new decision, although the extraction industry has been hard at work in keeping things quiet and behind the scenes. Even the fracking-induced earthquakes in Pennsylvania haven’t gotten seriously on general consciousness beyond people active in the struggle. When the DRBC reschedules the business meeting, I wonder how many will turn up to keep this voracious practice out of our region?

Less people are in denial than before about a water war coming. Most people imagine this war being carried out by one government on another with the “legitimate” violence of militaries to better the self-interest of one of the nations. I think most people imagine it happening in the future. The war over water has already begun, being waged on us by transnational corporations. The extraction companies, banks and the politicians that they fund are making policies backed by militarized police, private armies, and federal soldiers that creates huge financial gain for a very small number of people while the rest of us pay. The rest of us suffer along with the Earth.

What’s happening at Standing Rock is another example of how settler colonialism continues to rare its ugly head. It’s an old story for Indigenous peoples, one of federal disregard for their lives or ways of life. It’s also new because while they are poisoning the water, they are doing it at our behest. It’s our appetites for cheap gas that keep pipelines expanding. It’s our appetites for thermal comfort, for unrestricted use of fossil fuels in our cars and our homes that make fracking tolerable. We cannot just blame corporations with their private security forces, militarized police, and lawmakers wanting to break treaties by building pipelines or make huge profits on defiling practices like fracking. A few million of us need to take responsibility for our consumption habits and change them.

How does a historic peace church behave during times of war? Some of our Anabaptist cousins lean towards non-involvement. They might pull out of the questionable industries at most levels like the Amish and some Mennonites. Others will only see the people caught up in carrying out the dirty work of the drilling companies because they don’t have other viable economic options, and feel protective of their jobs (thus indirectly protecting the Gas Man). Others, like us, seem to be activating to wage peace during unfriendly times. Waging peace requires personal and communal disciplines as well as contributing to larger strategic work. Jesus will provide for us no matter what we do. Christ’s redeeming work in us doesn’t just help lift burdens of shame and guilt, it empowers us to act in ways that show evidence that we are made fully alive. Let’s make it easier for Jesus and leave some clean water for our grandkids and great grandkids to be able to drink.

When the water protectors at Oceti Sakowin camp were surrounded by police and private military, they chose to burn down their camp and walk out. They weren’t retiring or surrendering, they were proactively changing the battleground. That’s the kind of creative thinking we need right now in our watershed, even as we do our part in the national struggle against the corporations making war on us.

I suggest we act according to our calling by creating more options. We’re in a liminal time, where we are tethered tightly to dirty energy and don’t want to be – yet we don’t know how it will turn out. The Holy Spirit gives us imagination and creativity – especially when we move and act as a body. To fight fracking in our watershed, we need to do more than make legislation that holds off the drillers. We need to explore alternative energy sources and invest as a group in them. We are a living demonstration project. We can dream about what holy limits we need to respect that don’t keep creating more demand for harmful extraction practices. We need to share life – living out God’s good ideas – together, both for accountability to our dreams as well as including more people in the alternative-generation.

 

4 pro tips for enduring this Apocalypse

Some real UGLY has been revealed this week. This UGLY is around us, thrust upon us, inside of us, and in many cases coming out of us. I want to be brief and easy to read for different kinds of people so I’m making this list in the hope to help myself and others process some of our thinking and feeling so we can make more beauty in the midst of conflict. This apocalypse, an uncovering of a sorry state of the United States, has some new contours and threats. What’s also being revealed has been obvious to many people for a long time.

If you consider yourself woke or waking up, I hope this helps you. If you are frustrated and want other people to wake up from their Myth of Progress-induced slumber, I hope this equips you. If you’re skeptical about the future or even skeptical about faith I hope this post validates your feelings and makes for more options for you. I’m not trying to bring more condemnation upon us, I want to make possibilities for us to not get stuck. These “pro tips” are not meant to seem like I think I have all the answers or understand all the nuances of our problems. I hope they keep us moving in a healthy direction.

Pro tip: Feel your own feelings, think your own thoughts. Give your reactions, instincts, and emotions some names. Get to know them more. Like a song that gets stuck in your head, we are all susceptible to suggestion or picking up what’s in the air. I’m so symbiotic that I feel other people’s stress and need help differentiating it from my own. I spent at least an hour yesterday playing piano and singing. Music helps me to get in touch beyond my rational or cognitive processes. Some of my friends gathered last night to dance together. Get in touch with your own body, your own heart, your own mind – and see if that helps you likewise be able to get in touch with the heart of God.

Suggestions: Make a decision about what your deepest resonance will be today, or at least in this moment. Does confusion or frustration, shock or grief, anger or disgust need to be the primary lens you experience life? Do you want it to? I find Scripture, breath prayers, and songs very useful. We can choose what song will be stuck in our head. When you pray, you can ask Jesus to hold them with you. I find they become less overwhelming. [Psalm 139]

Pro tip: Confess how we/you have been complicit in systems that maintain white supremacy and related misogyny, phobias, etc. How has your attitude or behavior contributing to so many people not believing the stories of the oppressed? The president elect helped a lot of people see some deeply seeded issues the US generally does not want to deal with directly. Rather than pointing out how other people contribute all the time, start with confessing how you have internalized the dehumanizing messages, attitudes, or behaviors. It might be from a long time ago. It might be something you can see in your heart right now. The Western Church and recently those religious rule-makers (rather than spiritual practitioners) that we know as Evangelicals have helped settler colonialism flourish for generations. How have you intentionally or unintentionally helped the cause of the powerful?

Suggestions: Write some ideas in your journal. If you don’t have one, maybe now’s a good time to start a new reflective habit. Tell someone you trust, in person. These systems of injustice do not perpetuate themselves, they require active and complicit actors. Our limits and inability to have open hearted dialogue with relatives or other people that disagree with us become counter-productive to harmony and justice. [Psalm 32]

Pro tip: Consider the vitriol and material harm that has been unleashed this week. The maps show stark divisions in various ways, and we have no shortage of ways of thinking that categorize others and draw/see lines. For some of our US American relatives, an open season on minorities has begun. Racism that was underground has be legitimated enough by the recent political victories for it to be manifesting in frightening ways against the perceived “other.” Children in schools are getting told they will be deported, Nazi symbols painted in South Philly, and other likely worse things are on the horizon for people who are now even more vulnerable than they were. How has cruelty shaped us? What are your own instincts to dehumanize or make vulgar categorizations about others who don’t have your level of education or made a different choice at the polls?

Suggestions: Listen to those who have been living under chaotic threat, even as that group just multiplied. My brilliant Lakota friend Lenore told our cohort last night that “we are going to do what we always do. Natives endure. We will live through even this.” How can cruel attitudes and behaviors threaten your effort to make sanctuary, refuge, and safe spaces for yourself and others? [Luke 10]

Pro tip: What kind of alternatives do we need to embody? At the heart of protest are the seeds of possibility for the world that doesn’t exist quite yet. For Christians, we consider that the Movement of God is forming pockets of peace, resistance, and restoration all the time. It’s alraeady and not yet. We get to be part of it in a way that works for the flourishing of those not working directly with us. You don’t have to go at it alone. What kind of spaces do people need and what do you have to offer? Who are you going to work this out with?

Suggestions: Which of your feelings can be turned into action? The Movement of the Spirit has been in juxtaposition to what is unsettling us and will continue to. Last night people were protesting the next president. Black Lives Matter and water protectors at Standing Rock have been very active at making opportunities to demonstrate together. At my cell meeting this morning nine adults and two children did some good processing while making space for two people to join us that haven’t been with us before. What does that kind of inclusivity unlock? How could the Sunday meeting this week become a space of flexing our muscles of alternativity? [1 John 4]

From Befuddlement to Mystery during the Carnival de Resistance

I had two spiritually profound experiences two weeks ago that I don’t think I’ll ever forget. This is about one of them. I was part of the Carnival de Resistance residency in Minneapolis (many fond memories!), beginning a new seminary class and feeling lots of feelings. I was there for 10 days of a 30 person, 30 day eco village experiment and arts carnival – easily find pics on the Facebook page. I had been sitting for a few days with some difficult questions that had arisen during my seminary work. During one of our performances my befuddlement had moved into embracing mystery in a way where felt connected, and embraced back by God. I felt the Holy Spirit in my body as I drummed and choked through the lyrics to the anthem’s line “I’m gonna stay on the battlefield till I die…” You may want to listen to Sweet Honey in the Rock’s version while you read.

The Mexican muralistas walked behind our dancers (Jenna, Helen, Belle, and Tevyn – inspiring Circle of Hope partners!) with this banner (above) and raised their fists – both in defiance of tyranny and together with those defending water against the extraction industry with their private military. Everyone under the big top (besides people playing drums with both hands, I guess) raised a fist. It was the climactic moment of the show, the second time we performed it. It was more than an exhilaration from performance. It was more than just having strong and complicated emotions. I know what the presence of God feels like. God is there when I feel most alive, when I’m distressed – and still surprises me sometimes.

Experiences or activities that help us connect with God

I’m glad that I learned how to worship God at a young age – especially in the context of when the church gathers. Worshipping together has been a central discipline to my whole adult life. I use it as a time to be formed by bringing our hopes, worries, and everything else to God through mutual expression, often through art and music – while including others. Each of our meetings on Sunday night feel like an inclusive family dinner to me.

I’ve love how this meme can help us think about spaces of personal God time. They bring up a common problem – so many people unsuccessfully try to cram that experience into a church building and don’t acknowledge that a close encounter with God’s Spirit often happens when we’re doing what we love. I’ve heard people this year talk about developing intimacy with God when they run 5 miles, work on their garden, write a song, go hiking, sit in the woods and listen to birds, read and ponder the words of mystics, march against injustice, practice photography, consider the wonders of the universe, meditate on Scripture, dance, making a friend on purpose, paint, clean the house…I could go on.

These encounters don’t need a priestly figure performing the ceremonial rites ahead of time. Jesus made all times sacred, we just need to enter in. Everyone participating might not have the same intention and interpretation of the event. We do have unity of purpose at our Sunday meetings and cell meetings – we call it “setting the sacred space.” What practices or habits help you experience God’s presence? The two meetings of the church each week probably aren’t enough to sustain you longterm – part of following Jesus is growing your capacity to experience the Holy Spirit all the time.

We resist what we don’t already understand

Susan Boyle illustrated the classic aphorism

Susan Boyle illustrated the classic aphorism “don’t judge a book by its cover” on Britain’s got talent. *swoon

I heard one of our pastors, Gwen, say at Doing Theology last week that we are naturally suspicious of things we think are different than what we already know. I know I can be like that. When I don’t understand something or when an idea doesn’t reinforce something I already think/believe/feel – it takes some intentional work to not go with my instinct to close off, resist, or withdraw. It’s a risk because sometimes it’s healthy and others we miss something that the Spirit might be bubbling up.

If you’re still reading and ready for another relevant song, the First Nations DJ trio A Tribe Called Red dropped a new album recently that’s been on repeat for me. Here’s the first single featuring Yasiin Bey (Mos Def), “R.E.D.” 

I only have two classes left to complete for my Masters in Intercultural Studies degree through my seminary, NAIITS. My current class of ten people is Ethics in an Intercultural Context. Since it’s the North American Institute for Indigenous Theological Studies, we often consider implications of mission in Native contexts (historically, currently, and the future) and give special attention to Native experiences. My professor was not afraid to start our class off with some rather antagonistic writings by Vine Deloria – a hugely important Native scholar.

The assigned article and excerpts were hard for me to get through. I was taking a break from Carnival community life, trying to study before sending in my reflections for our weekly class Google hangout. I felt a little mentally blown out to sea. I was struggling to know what I felt or thought about questions raised in my readings, like:  Do Liberation Theologies really just reinforce white supremacy, perpetuating the same myths & systems that keep us from creating new ways of thinking and relating? Can Christians become spatial (connected to place) as well as temporal (going along time) in order to become more than colonizing to her non-members? I wanted to understand other perspectives and only had a few hours of dialogue. I was in that headspace for a few days, feeling befuddled while trying not to resist, withdraw, or close myself off to the new ideas.

As a group we, local pastor Jim Bear Jacobs (Mohican) showed us the documentary Dakota 38 and led a talking circle. The US had forced Dakota elders (mostly women) into a deadly internment camp, a final straw for the nation. They fought back. The day after the Emancipation Proclamation, President Lincoln ordered the largest mass execution in US history – to hang 38 of the leaders of the uprising. I highly recommend the documentary Dakota 38.

The Reality that doesn’t quite exist yet

As we work to realize together what “Your Kingdom come, Your will be done on earth as in heaven” means, we are not just biding our time. Don’t we actually experience pockets and moments of Christ’s Reality. Thinks click. They make sense in our heads, our hearts, together, and give us courage to live a demonstration of it. A little taste of heaven! Rather than thinking heaven only exists in some other strange planet or dimension, why not live into the new reality Jesus initiated and invites us into right here in our own planet, time, community, geography, and body? We can live into it together and make more pockets and moments where Jesus is the foundation of all – and harmony returns to earth.

Back to the climax of the CDR’s water show “Burning River” : Tevyn just gave a moving closing monologue that tied together elements of the show. Water is a gift from God and is necessary for life, health, and healing – in both the figurative (living water) and literal (rivers, etc) sense. Working for the health of the water is deeply connected to how we view creation – as a commodity or a gift from our Creator and we’re invited to baptism even in the polluted water. We’re singing, dancing, raising fists (see first paragraph). It all connected for me. We were in one of those sweet spots. Our discourse and ideas merged with saying yes and being part of the Spirit’s movement. It connected us to the struggle against evil and greed, and with those forming an alternative that was ready to act.

Don’t let your befuddlement keep you from engaging with God and the befuddled others (aka the church). We may feel how it’s working before we understand it completely. That’s the kind of life I get to be part of every day as part of Circle of Hope. We’re embodying an alternative to what people generally think is reality. Generating justice and hope and our neighborhood (not just someone else’s neighborhood) is at the heart of us. I’m pretty excited for what we’re going to do this week about it.  

 

 

 

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Lessons from the streets during the DNC

I don’t usually get blog requests from Circle of Hope leaders, so when one of them came to me, asking me to break down my reasons for so passionately railing against the system all the time, I decided to spend a few hours in the forest, getting back in touch with God and creation; I wanted enough solitude to figure out what it was I has to say, and I’m realizing it may take a couple post to break it down fully.

I’m want to make space for us to develop our ways of thinking. I spend a lot of time listening to radical people and live in a radical community of Jesus lovers, so my perspective is my own, but I’m eager to dialogue and grow together.

Spoiler alert/main point

I am part of a local expression of the trans-national, even trans-historical Body of Christ. I think our most important work– politically, spiritually, etc., is to embody alternatives, with Jesus, to a series of bad “choices” we’re spoon fed by the media and dominant culture. We are not doomed to remain stuck in between a series of bad options. God can fill us up and empower us to create pockets of resistance– where the Kingdom of Heaven Jesus refers to in the Bible can become very tangible and very accessible here on earth right now.

There are a lot of ways to participate in politics – I hope to sprinkle some hope, peace, and possibility into your day. You’ll notice that I talk about a lot of radical stuff including listening to, learning from, and organizing with different kinds of people than those who are most popular. You may need to do some side reading understand a few things but I’ll do lots of links and pics because you might not have read up on Black spiritual leaders or know why we are interested in what Mumia Abu Jamal has to say. I’m primarily speaking to people who are a part of Circle of Hope so I’m making some basic assumptions, but you don’t have to be into Jesus or Circle of Hope to get this.

Praising the Lord

I got to spend about 5 days outside around the time of the DNC – in the streets with several marches and demonstrations as well as attending panel discussions, pop up art exhibitions and worship sessions. I didn’t catch any of it on tv and saw only a few video clips but there seem to be a lot of people with some strong feelings about this election. So if you are feeling a wound up here is some examples of ways I turned my frustration with the powers that be into a generative force of community:

I spent most of my effort organizing drummers and Christians to Praise the Lord with drum and dance (Psalm 150) for two primary marches – the March for Our Lives with the Poor People’s Economic and Human Rights Campaign and the Black DNC Resistance March with the Phila Coalition for REAL Justice. I also was with the Moral Monday crew enjoying the Repairers of the Breach event (also at AFSC, some leaders pictured right), and enjoyed sitting under the trees with the peace and anti-war activists put together by the Brandywine Peace Community. Before I gave my hopeful 10min speech I met Emily Yates, an Iraq War Veteran for peace who sang a brilliant banjo singalong ditty about the failed promises of war administrations after Medea Benjamin and CODE PINK shared. Connecting with God in community this was so inspiring that our cell meeting this week included three people not normally part of it (we meet on Thurs 9am at Franny Lou’s Porch).

Reflection, Art, Field Trips, and “Taking the day off”

One angle – notice the US is made of guns

Taking a day of creative rest can help get you centered. The “Truth to Power” Revolutionary Art Exhibition by Rock the Vote included some of the most beautiful and disturbing images that reflected back a rather grim state that our nation is in. I loved the creativity and profound opportunity for networking. Nate took our Circle of Hope staff as a field trip and Jeremy gave his green architects the afternoon off to go drink it in.

I got into this DNC business with an “on-ramp”

Another angle – notice the US is a gun (made of guns)

of a profound Love Feast and baptisms in the Delaware River, a Kensington Royals sweep where I threw a complete game shutout, and an inspiring Sunday meeting. Afterwards, I spent time listening to the crickets and frogs like I mentioned earlier. Reflection is an important part of the action.

¡Escucha! ¡Escucha! ¡Estamos en la lucha!”

Some of my time was spent with dear friends from the Kentucky Workers League and their comrades at the Socialist Convergence (at AFSC) where we rocked out with the Global Grassroots Justice Alliance – a diverse group with indigenous people from the US and Honduras (at least) and my favorite new chant that means “Listen! Listen! We are in the struggle!”

I’m not a socialist myself, but appreciate the solidarity that can come from their class-conflict analysis, and heard several lucid insights: One of which was a more comprehensive definition of the economic concept neoliberalism. The ruling class continues to exploit everyone else and the earth. Neoliberalism sees competitive behavior as a foundational impulse between people. It turns souls with creativity and critical thinking skills into nothing more than consumers and puts an enormous emphasis on the power of the market to save us while simultaneously convincing people that their wealth was earned by merit and not as a result of privilege heaped upon privilege.

Also, If you don’t know your federal, state, and city reps – you may want to begin with learning about them rather than getting freaked out too bad by one president. IMO US Presidents have all been really bad in their own ways, with a few moments of exception since those old plantation owners and John Adams convinced poor immigrants to break off of their English father back in the 18th Century. There are useful ways to participate at many levels of government. I think there are a lot of good ways to participate in elections, including not participating in them. Don’t reduce your political participation down to one ballot or one election. Representative democracy, with its superdelegates and electoral college certainly will not produce justice for all or liberty for the disinherited.

I’ve listened to many of my indigenous, Latino, Queer, Christian, Jewish, and Muslim friends rail against Donald J’s bigotry, questionable morality, or the generally pathetic Republican notion that this man should be president. “Build a wall” or “register muslims” or the real enemy of the [white] US is Radical Islam are not policies. New SCOTUS judges could overturn Roe v Wade or make America ____ Again. The RNC held up a mirror up to the United States to see how ugly our fear and wealth hoarding can be. Lots to not like, eh? Does that mean we jump to supporting anyone who can defeat him?

Dr Anthony Monteiro, my favorite professor from Temple’s African American studies program leading a panel discussion at the Socialist Convergence about xenophobia

Dr. Anthony Montero and Mumia Abul Jamal had some opinions about the ruling class/warmongering party (Democrats) who have successfully and profitably connected mass incarceration and poverty at home with regime change and drone warfare abroad for 16 of the last 24 years. The transnational corporations are loving it! I had to consider a thought that I don’t think I could have come up with on my own because I’ve been so inundated with anti-Trump rhetoric. Mumia said in an interview from prison “If Trump is the price we have to pay to defeat Clintonian Neoliberalism — so be it.” I’ll just leave that there for a minute…

 

 

You can see that there are any number of reasons to support/not support either/both of the major candidates. Vote/not vote in a way that makes you feel like you had some integrity with your values and your behavior. If your civic duty is to cast a mere ballot every couple of years, you have already given away the leadership of our communities to corrupt Powers. We need to be organizing, demonstrating, praising God, and embodying the very things we hope and pray for. You can vote for the candidate/party that you want to lead the country. You can actually feel good about it, not just manipulated.

Jesus knits us together

I saw groups of people this week that I wish would come together but seemed separate. They were in

Art Bucher’s shot of four of our pastors and lots of friends praising the Lord during Monday’s March for Our Lives

Philadelphia at the same time. Jesus got to all of the good actions – especially those organized by poor people or those thirsty for the world that doesn’t quite exist yet. Circle of Hope was at a lot of the actions, too. Why can’t the anti-war groups (mostly gray haired white peaceniks who have worked since the 60s) hang with Black Lives Matter? Why were there six distinct socialist movements not knowing about each other? Why did the Wall of Love in the face of Westboro Baptist not connect to the Poor People’s march? They did connect – through the Spirit and through the people who made intentional or accidental overlap. We are all connected, especially those blessed ones who hunger & thirst for righteousness/justice. Let’s receive the courage to be OK with Jesus and do the good work we’ve been given to do, regardless of who wins certain elections.

 

protest, alton sterling, philandro castile

Let’s not allow violence to speak for us

map of africa

Matabeleland, the 2 western provinces, where the Brethren In Christ and Mennonite Central Committee have been active for over 100yrs

Lessons from Zimbabwe

When I spent some time in Zimbabwe recently, I got a lesson in what state violence can do to the psyche of a people. Between 1980-85, the Prime Minister’s Fifth Brigade killed between 30-40,000 people—specifically Ndebele people—in their own country. Since then half the population of the country fled for various reasons including economic. After hyperinflation, one industry that continued to grow was security. CMU blocks for walls, barbed wire, cameras or fake cameras were common and seemed to be more accessible than cars, couches, TVs, or other items more common right now in the US.

It took me a bit to understand why. No one I talked to was worried about theft, even though so many gates in africa, protest, alton sterlingpeople were poor. According to an MCC worker, over 80% of people in Matabeleland were unemployed. They found ways to share money like most countries without a middle class—if you get paid for work, you pay someone else for work. It’s common for someone who has a full-time job to have a gardener and housekeeper, who each in turn have people who they pay for small jobs. It’s a demonstration of resiliency. So why does almost every house have a protective wall? Why do the few affluent areas have barbed wires and security gates? The most simple answer—because the threat of state violence against the people has been proven, and those responsible are still in power.

State Violence and the Alternative

Jesus addressed the state violence against his own people while he walked around Roman-occupied Palestine. His nonviolent creativity has inspired Christians and others since. He generated alternatives to taking up arms (like Simon the Zealot wanted) and sliding into unconscious State sympathy (like Matthew the tax collector had done). His tactic was to embody the Kingdom of Heaven, calling people to follow him and his way.

robot used to bomb man in DallasLast week the Dallas police used a robot dropping a bomb to kill an Afghanistan war vet who tragically used his training to target police and rapid transit authorities after a peaceful protest. This morning I watched this video of the State using sound cannons mounted on an armored vehicle flanked by cops in riot gear —to break up protestors in Baton Rouge.

I’ve talked to a lot of people over the past week who feel overwhelmed by emotions. They are genuinely upset by the death of Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, and the 5 cops in Dallas. Probably like you, at least 6 of my friends posted Facebook status like “I’m off of Facebook for a while, it’s too sad.” I feel you. Some of those folks are going to find ways to cope with their feelings so they can go back to their business. Others are creating pockets of space to do something positive despite those feelings. Facebook isn’t the best vessel for transformation, anyway.

Don’t get it twisted. If you maintain silence about the racialized violence in the US and state violence from the US, you will allow the dominant voice of the state to settle the matter on your behalf. They are already at work and have more guns, tanks, boots on the ground, media outlets, money, and computer magic powers than the Peacemakers ever will. We need to BE the alternative with Jesus, and speak from the place of ultimate security—not a security that can be paid for with killing, but the one that defeated and unmasked the Powers by dying and rising.

Speak the Truth

We don’t have to be afraid to speak truth to them or tell the story of injustice, or proclaim God’s peace and harmony. Those who follow Jesus are already saved from the need to quietly accept what the masters prescribe for us. Let’s enjoy our freedom, let’s fill the resistance to violence with bold love, and use our deep spiritual-centeredness to make room for healing, restoration, and sustained resistance.

On Sunday we prayed about mass shootings in Orlando and Istanbul and the suicide bombing turned into fires in Baghdad. Last week we questioned the Death Penalty and the week before we bore witness against Drone Warfare.

I’m still blown away by the story of Leisha Evans this week (the woman in the featured image of this post). She went to her first protest, motivated by wanting a better world for her son, and after being arrested in one of the most beautiful scenes I can remember, she offered theses words:

I just need you people to know. I appreciate the well wishes and love, but this is the work of God. I am a vessel! Glory to the most high! I’m glad I’m alive and safe. And that there were no casualties that I have witnessed first hand.

I don’t want to stand by and let the militarizing nation state speak for me. I want to use the tools I have and the good work Christ has given me to speak from a community rooted in love, and to spread the courage not to hide in scared silence. Being able to say Black Lives Matter or post #blacklivesmatter is a good start for a lot of people. Let’s keep including people who want to form Beloved Community, to embody an alternative with Jesus through Circle of Hope. Let’s pray more. Let’s tell more stories about the Holy Spirit at work. Since we’ve received the redemption Jesus offers, let’s own it in a way that makes for more hope, more songs, more love, more justice, more peace, and more goodness that helps our communities thrive.

What do we do with a miracle?

Gerald‘s wife Yannick and their sons Berlins (14) and Dawens (10) have cleared the US/Haitian bureaucracies and arrived in the US last Thursday and at their new home on Monday.Their family’s story, a harrowing tale, not only teaches us how to build partnerships responsibly,
On Saturday, 50% of Circle Thrift proceeds (all locations) went to Heads Together Haiti, our compassion team that does empowering work both in Fayet. This turned out to be almost $2,000 and will go to helping re-settle the family.
Our compassion team and some friends tried to make this frigid first impression of life in Philadelphia warmer with a care package and some drumming and dancing – check out Julian’s vid here of Gerald & Yannick dancing for joy with Dawn and the drummers. I’m really grateful for my friend to be together with his family. I also am married with two children about their ages. I can barely fathom how it would feel to be separated from my family because of violent desperation for over three years, or the joy of being together again in a new country and climate.

The Circle of Hope Leadership Team talked a bit at last Monday’s Imaginarium about partnering well. Here’s more to the story of how this partnership has worked over the years, and how we hope it will continue.

It was also a Tuesday, six years ago last week that the earthquake hit Haiti. We had already been working with Tetan San (Heads Together) for six months through our compassion team as well as other groups we’re connected to like Haiti Partners. Everyone on our team has been to Haiti, either before or after the quake. Because of Gerald‘s access to money from the US in an impoverished, rural, and now earthquake-torn region, he was abducted by a gang and held for ransom. He knew that staying in Fayet meant paying growing tributes to the gang who held him. The literacy and community organizing, including administrating the school we helped rebuild,  would be considerably compromised. His wife and two sons (then about 8 and 4) fled to a friend’s home in a nearby village.
Not knowing what to do, Gerald fled to Philadelphia in the summer of 2012, where he had a small but dedicated support network – among us. With the trauma and definite threat, he hoped to find a haven for his family and to be able to continue aspects of his community work. While speaking both French and Creole, his English was not great. We needed some creativity to get him to the US as immigration from Haiti is extremely difficult. Refugee status would only protect him. We needed a miracle.
We began a legal process/battle to attain amnesty so his whole family could relocate to Philadelphia, or at least to the US. We invested in legal help and Gerald found ways to work (like Circle Thrift!!) and develop his English language skills. A few months ago, we got the good news that even while many Haitians got temporary extensions of their Temporary Protected Status, Gerald‘s case was permanent and extended to his family. It’s taken more prayer, money, and time to get to this point.
With many thanks to Haiti Partners and the House of Grace Catholic Worker, the family is about to be reunited.
We continue, through Gerald and the rest of the team, to do grassroots work of proliferating possibilities for kids, especially, in Fayet. His heart inspires me. I’m grateful that we can partner with such a dedicated leader. With many other larger forces at work – including political and economic freezing out of Haiti since their independence, we played a role in this story before we got involved directly in 2009 with these folks from Fayet. I’m grateful for the courage of so many to stay involved, pray for miracles, and follow the Holy Spirit as we work out some small solutions to large problems. 
What do we do when we’ve prayed for something for this long that was really unlikely, most would even say not going to actually happen? Can we be grateful? Can our faith be strengthened? Do we dream bigger? I hope we can see God working in the partnership – even in the ups and downs – and feel like we can actually change the world. Jesus wants to. Jesus is.

Conflict can generate beauty

Photo by Jack Fusco

I got to take a quick trip up through Ontario last week. My family and I got to experience the beauty of the Niagara River, Niagara Falls (including the Hornblower!), and maybe best of all – we laid on the shores of Lovesick Lake and observed the Perseid Meteor Shower. We didn’t even know it was going to happen, I think my kids just thought it was Canadian magic or being 2hrs from a city and light pollution. The reason we can see such glory is not because junk is falling from space onto us – it’s because the earth swings through a bunch of rock/debris in our orbit each year around this time. It’s conflict. The earth is coming through, and the bits (like a tiny asteroid belt) pass into the planetary orbit and turn into fireballs and “wakes of light.” Spectacular.

We experience conflict every day. Most of the time we don’t get too emotionally involved and we find solutions easier when our defense mechanisms don’t take over. I find that when our emotions get to firing, we generally respond to threat in one of three ways: avoidance, assertion, or combustion. These categories aren’t scientific or anything but can generally describe most reactions.

Jesus lived in the middle of conflict. Besides the overlay of Greek/Roman empire influence, his tribal life existed during a spiritual reform as well as survival movements in the face of warrant kings and economic disparity. As he gathered folks from many walks of life, he also created conflict. Whether he called disciples out of their collusion with the states, out of their family business, or from under a fig tree, Jesus moved people to make changes. That meant leaving job, family, etc – not easy stuff to walk away from.

I have been enjoying a lot of conflict lately that Circle of Hope lives in. I think we have the vitality and centeredness to discern the Holy Spirit and move with God – that’s what this whole Second Act thing is about. We are trying to move beyond what has worked so far and change. I think our leaders have shown a lot of courage thus far. Each of us has to do our own processing about this particular threat. I hope we don’t just avoid it, I think that would be the worst. Combusting or asserting both keep us moving.

Our Compassion Core got about 120 of us to meet up at 9pm the other week at the future

Photo by Amanda Capasso

headquarters for the Phila Police to remember Mike Brown and other victims of racialized police brutality and to pray in a new era of justice in our city. We prayed for police (especially those who don’t wan to kill anybody, don’t want to stop & frisk, etc), for leaders, for those involved in the numerous stories we read, and for God to wake us up with justice. I think getting somewhere at 9 pm created conflict, so did the racial focus of the event, as well as not blindly siding with the authorities. About half the people who went didn’t RSVP on Facebook – maybe they are not on FB or maybe they didn’t want it on their feed because it was about Jesus or Black Lives Matter. I had a few combusting conversations about it, especially if I enumerated that last sentence. I felt the assertion more than anything – over 100 people feeling moved to do a notable act of compassion that brought us together and made a statement in the world! That was spectacular – like the meteor shower. Conflict was beautiful.

Last Sunday my good friend Drew Hart spoke at our Sunday meetings (listen to it here). They went long, especially because he was helping people process how we are “Taking on the form of Christ in this racialized world.” I appreciate both his prophetic, truth-telling brilliance paired with a pastoral instinct to help people move along the journey from right where they are at. I could sense lights turning on as he pointed out how we can jump on individuals for saying racist things (like the Hulkster lately) because it absolves us – but it doesn’t see how we are being formed by a racist system that produces the attitudes. By getting at the system, with the hope and power in Jesus, we can make personal changes and move together to form something new every day (not just on Sundays or protest days).

 

I’ve had the privilege of working with a lot of couples – married and about to be – in counseling sessions. We do a lot of work about communication and conflict. I get to co-captain an amazing baseball team that is full of conflict – every pitch. After a session with some business partners the other day, I felt grateful to be living with so many people who want to get at solutions – even if it’s in the middle of combustion. It’s quite a beautiful thing to want to solve a conflict with another person. After all, we live in a world where we send unmanned drones to blow up houses, people stab each other over a few bucks around the corner, and Black men are being locked at astonishing rates. Getting beyond just intention and into transformative relationship with Jesus, the earth, and one another is still the most spectacular thing I’ve ever seen.

Junteenth 2015: freedom has its delays yet hope prevails

A bunch of my friends are so-called white people. In the past few days on Facebook, several even warned people against talking racial politics on their feed or place of work. I generously assume they are trying to shut down the white people they know who want to deny that the Charleston Shooting continues a long thread of violence against Black people in the US. I want to think that because their white friends celebrated when George Zimmerman or Darren Wilson walked. By the way, the “I Support Darren Wilson” FB group has almost 90,000 members. I also wish stories of outrageous violence against black people would stop, and I think Jesus does, too. Until we get there, I can’t imagine Jesus not getting shot, abused, left out, and executed. I also cannot imagine Jesus not rising and forming an alternative.

Jon Stewart’s joke-free monologue last night is still blowing up, being liked and shared by all sorts of folks. I appreciated his connection that state violence abroad to “protect American lives” – including drone warfare, invasions and torture – with violence against American lives at home. He presumed “we” when speaking for the country. That was a bold move, and people like me don’t often want to think that we are part of the “we” that continues to commit atrocities against people part of a racial group because they are part of that racial group. Jesus forms an alternative while caring and acting with those who suffer, being present in the suffering and offering hope for something different.

Today we are able to celebrate Juneteenth – the oldest celebration of the end of racialized chattel enslavement in the US. You see, there was a few delays to freedom in Texas in the days before communication was so fast and accessible here. Most understand that the Confederacy didn’t officially recognize the Emancipation Proclamation (1/1/1863) until the end of the war (4/9/1865). It wasn’t until June 19, 1865 that Texas came along. Imagine being part of the group who did not know about Lincoln’s decree or the news from the battle front only to find out that the law had made you free years/months before. I think there’s a complex array of anger & frustration to distain but gratitude, elation and celebration must have prevailed. During a week when #askRachel was taking over the emotional airwaves in the wake of the McKinney debacle, Juneteenth can be a day when Charleston has its full context with the emotions, memories, realities, and hopes that media outlets cannot give us and cannot take away.

Some powerful memes are also floating around today to clarify that the recent white supremacist murder rampage in an AME church’s prayer meeting was more than a random act of violence or one sick person’s twisted response to their delusion. We are still in conflict with a system that protects white supremacy and white skin privilege. The battles are still (Ephesians 6) against rulers, powers, and authorities both in spirit and in this world that are systemic, not just against individuals or people.

African Electro artist Young Paris’ post as of now has over 200k likes and 250k+ shares.

There are always exceptions to the general flow and other people are mistreated or rewarded. Symbols remain in prominent places particularly and powerfully serve as seen things to point to unseen ideas. Whether it’s on your t-shirt, a tattoo, the name of a street, or the flag above government buildings – we choose what we display/advertise/evangelize for a purpose. Take Jesus dying on the cross and using the symbol of the cross to identify his followers. What does the symbol mean to you and what does it mean to your neighbor?

From the Southern Poverty Law Center

Attacking a symbol can be as powerful as the symbol itself. Burning a flag is potent, open defiance. When doing anything symbolically, the act itself is open to interpretation. Sometimes the point is unclear or perceived as inappropriate or offense. Sometimes disrespect or questioning legitimacy is a step towards forming something new. Jesus’ defiance sometimes looks pretty assertive like standing up to turn your other cheek to get punched like a human instead of backhand slapped like a subordinate. Other times it looks like defeating the powers of sin and death and walking out of a tomb.

We are working with some real spirit, flesh & blood problems and I’m really grateful to be working out some spirit, flesh & blood solutions with so many people. We have opportunities to be formed by the Holy Spirit into a people that don’t need to just identify injustice, we can be part of the Beloved Community that demonstrates justice.

I have found that my hope in the Kingdom of God outshines my quest for freedom and justice while also being the solar power that runs it. The source of my hope is what fuels my activism or gives me the juice to want to stay in the game with such overwhelming opposition. I do not think the Church is a place to hide from the injustice of the world in hopes for a future just world. I have found that especially in Circle of Hope the church is a healthy soil polyculture for the Holy Spirit to cultivate resistance and restoration. Jesus didn’t shy away from hard conversations or avoid the people who disagreed with him. His hope was an opportunity for transformation that forms us into transformation agents for God.