Hinkie died for our sins: Finding Faith through Trusting the Process

I’m trying to write this so that people who don’t follow the Philadelphia 76ers, the NBA, or sportsball in general to be able to track. The religious motifs throughout the past five years around Philadelphia basketball stand on their own as symbols of a kind of faith. They also speak to my processes both as a Sixers fan and a follower in the way of Jesus. 

Enter Sam Hinkie, executive par excellence 

On May 14, 2013 the Sixers hired basketball analytics savant Sam Hinkie as general manager. His bold vision: to bring the franchise through three horrifying years of collecting assets and trading away any talent or veterans. Critics around the league said that the basketball gods frowned upon such blatant “tanking,” or losing now on purpose in order to stockpile draft picks and build a team from a clean foundation. Fans marked his memorable contribution with deep conviction..Trust the Process.

At the end of his 34 month brilliant and notorious ride as the antihero of basketball executives, Hinkie gave a 13pg gift to the world in the form of his resignation letter. He wrote about “a tolerance of uncertianty,” the “necessity of innovation,” the “importance of intellectual humility,” and “the longest view in the room.” I embraced this man and his vision right away, and my heart is warmed by his courage. I learned what optionality was. He will not be able to enjoy the fruit of his good work as a Sixer, but must be happy with all of the affirmations that have been coming lately.

Making the God connection, beyond the meme

At the end of his term, his risky ask were sacrifice and faith. He asked a board of trustees and fanbase to forgo conventional wisdom to grind it out and wait for a miracle for a longer term plan that would have a higher chance to reap larger rewards. Was all the #HinkieDiedForOurSins just blasphemy, tongue-in-cheek memes showing how post-Christian we really are in the US, or could it be a deep reach toward finding meaning in suffering? 

You may or may not know, but at the NBA Draft tonight (coverage begins at 7pm), the Sixers (by leveraging assets acquired by my boy Sam) have the first pick. They had the first pick last year, too. The acquisition of elite talent through the draft remains essential to perennial success in the NBA. In a few hours, we will have three players who have the potential to become superstars. The opportunity to acquire such talent through the draft could not have happened without sustained losing, drafting players that would not play for a few years, and trading away good players for future picks.

Proclaiming that The Process has arrived

Perhaps no one embodies The Process as much as the transcendent talent and personality of Joel Embiid. Before he made his long awaited debut, he missed two full seasons because of foot surgery and complications from growing from 7’0″ to 7’2″. While we waited, The Ringer made a 10min mockumentary about him called The Legacy of a Legend, which he of course ReTweeted. Leading up to his debut last season, he asked to be announced at games as Joel “The Process” Embiid. Jojo boldly proclaimed that The Process had arrived, and pointed to himself as evidence. 

Being Bible reader for most of my life, I feel like I have seen this movie before. But I have not seen a new reality announced and practiced in a way that inspired me like this. Joel helped me understand the gospel more deeply. In the first verse of Mark’s gospel, he lifts a cultural term that I missed for a long time. When he says “the beginning of the good news of Jesus Christ, the Son of God” he didn’t coin the term gospel. Rome spread news of a military victory, to be celebrated when they brought the good news. Mark flipped it to meaning a release of the Good Story – the Prince of Peace had begun a re-harmonization process that was divinely re-ordering everything. 

Trusting our own processes 

When I began my second stint with higher ed in the Fall of 2008, I did not see a clear timeline or endpoint. I wanted to learn and re-orient my brain, and become a better pastor. As I recently completed seminary, I look back at a long run of stimuli and change. I hit roadblocks that I couldn’t see past at times. I experienced a mental fatigue that I didn’t know was possible. I trusted the wise people around me and that the Spirit was going to use these challenges for God’s good purposes. I also enjoyed graduating more than I expected I could.

As much as it has been hard to be a Sixers fan while they put up historically bad teams, real life is harder. I’m walking with some friends who are giving up on their processes before they come to good ends. The hardest times in life are often right before we turn a corner. This is an encouragement to trust God and your spiritual friendships when you’re confused or in crisis.

I hope you get encouraged by finding some faith out there, even in unexpected places. Faith is a lot more than a series of beliefs, faith is working the spiritual muscle that helps us connect. Faith is more a midwife to hope and perseverance than it is a crutch or painkiller. I found real faith in Philadelphia over these years, even if it mocks my faith a bit. I feel like a lot of us have endured some trying seasons. I am also giving witness to a new beginning that we are experiencing because of the work of God in our hearts. Won’t you go with it? 

 

Tanking with the Sixers for Lent

Love is central to our common life and common work. Our pastors and staff work on their love. We enjoy our work most of the time, and find it fun and lifegiving. We also make time to have fun together. To play. More common experiences shape us and build up our love and our sense of team.

I excitedly got us to buy Sixers tickets. We just suffered three years of taking, where the team kept the roster slim and traded away veteran talent for draft picks and players hanging out in Europe. This year some very talented rookies took the floor, and the #1 draft pick last year was set to return from his foot surgery. When Joel Embiid was playing out of his mind and the date for Ben Simmons’ debut was seemingly just days away, I thought seeing a young team playing well and sorting itself out would be good for us. Our team is young in a lot of ways – people are in new roles over the past two years and we’ve expanded to include more pastors over the past few months!  Then came more injuries and Joel and Ben were shut down for the rest of the year. The trade deadline did not pass without unloading more veteran talent for draft picks and project players. Tank 4.0 ensues. 

What can we learn from watching terrible basketball? Only a few of us are fans, and we hadn’t all been to a professional sporting event before. So there’s a lot we can learn just from bringing people with varying levels of interest and experience together. We can also learn about what it’s like to gut out harder times – startups, new ideas, life’s limitations, and high learning curves.  I’m among the dwindling yet faithful remnant who still #TrustTheProcess, I believe that all the losing is actually building a juggernaut from next season over the next 5 (at least). That’s a lot like Lent. We’re uncovering our limits and obstacles, and receiving what we need from God to face our suffering. We don’t think we’ll overcome it all right away. We know all of our efforts will pay off in the way we want or hope. We do want to learn how to hold on to hope – that Jesus is in our pain as we suffer with Jesus in his – and the Spirit will make us to bear good fruit for God. We need the Holy Spirit’s inspiration and equipping to overcome our important obstacles and we have her, just like the Sixers need and have Dario Saric. 

I’m so grateful for this classically wonderful group of people. It was so sweet and fun to be together knowing that as good and difficult as our work is right now, our future is even brighter.

In case you don’t recognize them all…(bottom row, left to right) Rod White, Gwen White, Ben White, Rachel Sensenig (middle row, left to right) Nate Hulfish, Joshua Grace, Bethany Hornak, Julie Hoke, Jerome Stafford, Jonny Rashid (top row) a few friendly onlooking coworkers. Missing: Luke Bartolomeo and our part time Local Site Supervisors Jimmy, Pilar, Kim, and Krissy. You can read more about our dynamic team here.

Pray for our squad (Circle of Hope, although many Sixers would appreciate it, too). We are daring to take risks with a brave face. We take great comfort in knowing we have so many parters wanting to co-create in making more beauty with the Spirit together. 

An opportunity for wonder

What is more wonder-full than wonder in the eyes of children? I think that’s one thing that makes Christmas time so special for a lot of people. Wonder has become a serious spiritual discipline for me, as weird as that might sound. During Advent I get even more serious about wonder – the decorations, songs, smells, and other traditions hopefully help stoke my imagination about deeper meaning. I need to try to wrap my heart and my mind around this Story again every year or else I’ll think it’s normal.

Creator becoming part of creation honestly blows my mind, and I want it to. It doesn’t really get my imaginative fires burning – beckoning me to spend time every day considering what it means, motivating my heart, my behavior, and my relationships – unless I keep the disciplines that keep me mindful of how Jesus is being born anew. What in me could get renewed?

I’ve heard from friends that the best part of giving a present is watching the child open it and freak out. That’s fun, but a lot of pressure to keep up (my kids are 15 and 12 now, that’s a lot of Xmas’s). For me, the best part of giving a gift is being part of a larger generosity movement and expressing God’s generosity by making his dwelling among us. It opens up universes of possibilities. There are daily practices that help me – Circle of Daily Prayer [water] has been offering a song every day. That might be a good enough start for you.

We face a lot of dangers. It looks like Donald J. is going to become our president. People are having a lot of difficulty staying together. It rained this week and I had more people tell me they wanted to hurt themselves than the rest of the year combined. I’ve heard of families splitting up or about to. Perpetual, preemptive war continues abroad and the battle of capitalism vs creation continues at home and Obama still won’t stand up for the Standing Rock Sioux against the banks, extraction giants, and their militarized police/mercenaries. Another unarmed black kid got killed over nothing – James Means was 15.

People are financially strained and somehow the internet was permitted to boss around everyone’s money for a week by making a consumer spectacle out of Thanksgiving/Black Friday/Small Business Saturday/Cyber Monday/Giving Tuesday. Don’t fall for it. It’s the reverse order of your values, anyway – right? Don’t let it break your sense of wonder. Don’t let this stuff get you away from a deeper reality…that Jesus is calling us back into harmony with God, with one another, and with creation. We form alternatives to the destructive symptoms and act in ways that oppose the pathologies that cause such alienation.

We have so many opportunities to get our goodness fueled and help heal some wounds this month. Get some good stuff from God and spread it around. There’s enough comfort & joy to go around. You may want to get your calendar out…

Nov 27 First Sunday of Advent

We explored the prophets pointing to another way and listened to stories from the water protectors at Standing Rock to connect to our own dissonance, resilience, and rejoicing. You might even want to join in tomorrow on a #NoDAPL Day of Action.

Dec 2-3 Art Shop This is our 12th expression of 50+ local artist/crafter/makers.

Dec 4 – Second Sunday of Advent

We’re looking to John the Baptizer who signals the time has arrived and listening to Black Lives Matter to connect to our own dissonance, resilience, and rejoicing. 5 & 7pm at 2007 Frankford

Dec 10 – House show: music/poetry/wonder/potluck/NoDAPL Me and Martha are trying to throw an inclusive party. Some of my favorite performers will be performing. We’re gonna raise some funds for Standing Rock. Potluck starts at 6:30

Dec 11 – Third Sunday of Advent

This time Mary and Joseph prepare for the miracle. We’re getting into the Magnificat a whole bunch. These migrants get us to looking at the absurdity of talk of “building a wall” and undocumented people in our own communities that help us connect to our own dissonance, resilience, and rejoicing. Some of us have been part of the #right2work dinner series, highlighting undocumented restaraunt workers in Philly.

Dec 17 – Free Baby & Kids Goods Exchange (10am-1pm at 2007 Frankford). This is usually our largest monthly session where parents and those expecting practice redistribution of kid stuff and saving ecological and environmental impact. We still need volunteers to set up, hang out, drive people home, and clean up.

Dec 18 – Fourth Sunday of Advent

We will light the fourth Advent candle for the Shepherds, who respond to the news of Jesus being born with songs of joy. We turn our ears to Syria and other people displaced through the war of terror to help us connect to our own dissonance, resilience, and rejoicing. 5 & 7 pm at 2007 Frankford.

Dec 20 – Caroling through Kensington/Fishtown  – meet at 6:30 at 2007 Frankford, we’ll start walking at 7 and return for warm drinks and snacks. I don’t really like Christmas carols, I’ll confess, but I do love how moved my neighbors get when 100+ of us sing to them. It can be life changing. 

Dec 21 – Homeless Memorial Day, 5-6pm at 15th & JFK. We will assert the dignity of all persons and remember those who died this year. Many won’t have another formal rembrance.

Dec 24 – Christmas Eve, 10:45pm vigil at 1125 S. Broad (also there’s a 4pm family-oriented observance). Sometimes we watch the big flakes of snow fall out the window while we hold candles singing Silent Night at midnight. That or something else magical might happen.

Dec 25 – Silent Night, Holy Night – 60min of candlelight reflection at 5 and 7 at 2007 Frankford. Loads of snacks in between. Lots of people need somewhere warm, indoors, and kind to be on Christmas. I love it when it’s on a Sunday because it’s easy to make it about Jesus.

Lessons from the streets during the DNC

I don’t usually get blog requests from Circle of Hope leaders, so when one of them came to me, asking me to break down my reasons for so passionately railing against the system all the time, I decided to spend a few hours in the forest, getting back in touch with God and creation; I wanted enough solitude to figure out what it was I has to say, and I’m realizing it may take a couple post to break it down fully.

I’m want to make space for us to develop our ways of thinking. I spend a lot of time listening to radical people and live in a radical community of Jesus lovers, so my perspective is my own, but I’m eager to dialogue and grow together.

Spoiler alert/main point

I am part of a local expression of the trans-national, even trans-historical Body of Christ. I think our most important work– politically, spiritually, etc., is to embody alternatives, with Jesus, to a series of bad “choices” we’re spoon fed by the media and dominant culture. We are not doomed to remain stuck in between a series of bad options. God can fill us up and empower us to create pockets of resistance– where the Kingdom of Heaven Jesus refers to in the Bible can become very tangible and very accessible here on earth right now.

There are a lot of ways to participate in politics – I hope to sprinkle some hope, peace, and possibility into your day. You’ll notice that I talk about a lot of radical stuff including listening to, learning from, and organizing with different kinds of people than those who are most popular. You may need to do some side reading understand a few things but I’ll do lots of links and pics because you might not have read up on Black spiritual leaders or know why we are interested in what Mumia Abu Jamal has to say. I’m primarily speaking to people who are a part of Circle of Hope so I’m making some basic assumptions, but you don’t have to be into Jesus or Circle of Hope to get this.

Praising the Lord

I got to spend about 5 days outside around the time of the DNC – in the streets with several marches and demonstrations as well as attending panel discussions, pop up art exhibitions and worship sessions. I didn’t catch any of it on tv and saw only a few video clips but there seem to be a lot of people with some strong feelings about this election. So if you are feeling a wound up here is some examples of ways I turned my frustration with the powers that be into a generative force of community:

I spent most of my effort organizing drummers and Christians to Praise the Lord with drum and dance (Psalm 150) for two primary marches – the March for Our Lives with the Poor People’s Economic and Human Rights Campaign and the Black DNC Resistance March with the Phila Coalition for REAL Justice. I also was with the Moral Monday crew enjoying the Repairers of the Breach event (also at AFSC, some leaders pictured right), and enjoyed sitting under the trees with the peace and anti-war activists put together by the Brandywine Peace Community. Before I gave my hopeful 10min speech I met Emily Yates, an Iraq War Veteran for peace who sang a brilliant banjo singalong ditty about the failed promises of war administrations after Medea Benjamin and CODE PINK shared. Connecting with God in community this was so inspiring that our cell meeting this week included three people not normally part of it (we meet on Thurs 9am at Franny Lou’s Porch).

Reflection, Art, Field Trips, and “Taking the day off”

One angle – notice the US is made of guns

Taking a day of creative rest can help get you centered. The “Truth to Power” Revolutionary Art Exhibition by Rock the Vote included some of the most beautiful and disturbing images that reflected back a rather grim state that our nation is in. I loved the creativity and profound opportunity for networking. Nate took our Circle of Hope staff as a field trip and Jeremy gave his green architects the afternoon off to go drink it in.

I got into this DNC business with an “on-ramp”

Another angle – notice the US is a gun (made of guns)

of a profound Love Feast and baptisms in the Delaware River, a Kensington Royals sweep where I threw a complete game shutout, and an inspiring Sunday meeting. Afterwards, I spent time listening to the crickets and frogs like I mentioned earlier. Reflection is an important part of the action.

¡Escucha! ¡Escucha! ¡Estamos en la lucha!”

Some of my time was spent with dear friends from the Kentucky Workers League and their comrades at the Socialist Convergence (at AFSC) where we rocked out with the Global Grassroots Justice Alliance – a diverse group with indigenous people from the US and Honduras (at least) and my favorite new chant that means “Listen! Listen! We are in the struggle!”

I’m not a socialist myself, but appreciate the solidarity that can come from their class-conflict analysis, and heard several lucid insights: One of which was a more comprehensive definition of the economic concept neoliberalism. The ruling class continues to exploit everyone else and the earth. Neoliberalism sees competitive behavior as a foundational impulse between people. It turns souls with creativity and critical thinking skills into nothing more than consumers and puts an enormous emphasis on the power of the market to save us while simultaneously convincing people that their wealth was earned by merit and not as a result of privilege heaped upon privilege.

Also, If you don’t know your federal, state, and city reps – you may want to begin with learning about them rather than getting freaked out too bad by one president. IMO US Presidents have all been really bad in their own ways, with a few moments of exception since those old plantation owners and John Adams convinced poor immigrants to break off of their English father back in the 18th Century. There are useful ways to participate at many levels of government. I think there are a lot of good ways to participate in elections, including not participating in them. Don’t reduce your political participation down to one ballot or one election. Representative democracy, with its superdelegates and electoral college certainly will not produce justice for all or liberty for the disinherited.

I’ve listened to many of my indigenous, Latino, Queer, Christian, Jewish, and Muslim friends rail against Donald J’s bigotry, questionable morality, or the generally pathetic Republican notion that this man should be president. “Build a wall” or “register muslims” or the real enemy of the [white] US is Radical Islam are not policies. New SCOTUS judges could overturn Roe v Wade or make America ____ Again. The RNC held up a mirror up to the United States to see how ugly our fear and wealth hoarding can be. Lots to not like, eh? Does that mean we jump to supporting anyone who can defeat him?

Dr Anthony Monteiro, my favorite professor from Temple’s African American studies program leading a panel discussion at the Socialist Convergence about xenophobia

Dr. Anthony Montero and Mumia Abul Jamal had some opinions about the ruling class/warmongering party (Democrats) who have successfully and profitably connected mass incarceration and poverty at home with regime change and drone warfare abroad for 16 of the last 24 years. The transnational corporations are loving it! I had to consider a thought that I don’t think I could have come up with on my own because I’ve been so inundated with anti-Trump rhetoric. Mumia said in an interview from prison “If Trump is the price we have to pay to defeat Clintonian Neoliberalism — so be it.” I’ll just leave that there for a minute…

 

 

You can see that there are any number of reasons to support/not support either/both of the major candidates. Vote/not vote in a way that makes you feel like you had some integrity with your values and your behavior. If your civic duty is to cast a mere ballot every couple of years, you have already given away the leadership of our communities to corrupt Powers. We need to be organizing, demonstrating, praising God, and embodying the very things we hope and pray for. You can vote for the candidate/party that you want to lead the country. You can actually feel good about it, not just manipulated.

Jesus knits us together

I saw groups of people this week that I wish would come together but seemed separate. They were in

Art Bucher’s shot of four of our pastors and lots of friends praising the Lord during Monday’s March for Our Lives

Philadelphia at the same time. Jesus got to all of the good actions – especially those organized by poor people or those thirsty for the world that doesn’t quite exist yet. Circle of Hope was at a lot of the actions, too. Why can’t the anti-war groups (mostly gray haired white peaceniks who have worked since the 60s) hang with Black Lives Matter? Why were there six distinct socialist movements not knowing about each other? Why did the Wall of Love in the face of Westboro Baptist not connect to the Poor People’s march? They did connect – through the Spirit and through the people who made intentional or accidental overlap. We are all connected, especially those blessed ones who hunger & thirst for righteousness/justice. Let’s receive the courage to be OK with Jesus and do the good work we’ve been given to do, regardless of who wins certain elections.

 

Engaging while our city hosts the DNC

Unimpressed

Like many of you that will actually read this post, I am utterly unimpressed with the Republican National Convention last week in Cleveland—including how the police state handled demonstrators. This article describes a little bit about why it was kind of quiet, despite the national unrest/love/rage/ambivalence over Donlad J…”A big part of the reason was that protesters just did not descend on Cleveland in the numbers predicted. Black Lives Matter instead devoted its efforts last week to occupying the police union headquarters of New York and Washington, D.C., and many progressive groups opted to instead put their energies toward protesting the Democratic National Convention (DNC) in Philadelphia this week.

I’m feeling pretty unimpressed with the Democrats as they have begun their attempt to get people excited to not elect Trump, and see if more people will slide into support for Clinton and her new running mate and Asian Free-Trade advocate Tom Kaine. I am impressed, however, by how many of my connections in Philadelphia want to re-frame the discourse from talking about how electing one person will lead to the end of the world and the other to paradise. I know most people aren’t actually that deluded, but the anti-Donlad rhetoric could use some feet in the streets rather than just internet comments.

Psalm 150 and Praising

I’m moved by the final Psalm (150) this morning.

Praise the Lord!

Praise God in his sanctuary!
    Praise God in his fortress, the sky!
Praise God in his mighty acts!
    Praise God as suits his incredible greatness!
Praise God with the blast of the ram’s horn!
    Praise God with lute and lyre!
Praise God with drum and dance!
    Praise God with strings and pipe!
Praise God with loud cymbals!
    Praise God with clashing cymbals!
Let every living thing praise the Lord!

Praise the Lord!

I’m going to be praising the Lord Jesus this week with drum and dance/marching. I hope you feel like you can get into some of this stuff, even if it may not be your thing. These politicians and their corporate sponsors have come to our city, and I’d like to meet them with the praise of God and assertion of embodied alternatives to red/blue binary conversations towards moving hearts and minds.

Opportunities

A bunch of Circle of Hope folks asked for some of us to curate opportunities to get in where you will know someone and can process it together. Not everyone can go to these, and not everyone wants to. Our church is full of all different kinds of people, and I love that we make space for dialogue from where people are actually at—not where I think they should be. So here are a few opportunities in which I will be participating. You can add to the list if you want. I bring Jesus when I march and drum. I’m looking for partners when I do it. I’m happy to add what I’ve been given to this good mix of important issues that can help people come together.

Monday:

3pm March For Our Lives at City Hall (South side) walking South. Shane, Blew, and I have been involved in different levels of planning. The elders, children, and people with mobility issues will be at the front of this march to get issues of poor people & poverty in the front of conversations about policy.

6:30pm Repairers of the Breach Moral Revival at AFSC (1501 Cherry st). I respect the work of Rev Barber and the Moral Monday crew in North Carolina. Shane helped get this event going in Phila.

Tuesday:

2pm Black DNC Resistance March at Broad & Diamond, walking South to City Hall. I’ve marched with Phila Coalition for REAL Justice several times, and I find Black Lives Matter actions to be profound and full of righteous indignation and so much beauty and hope. 

I won’t be going to the South Phila Blue Line Up Rally For Peace #alllivesmatter in August, but that vibe will be around this week, too. All sorts of people will be out this week and during this overblown election season. I still think our vocation is embodying alternatives with Jesus, not jumping along party lines or bowing out of the discourse.  

What do we do with a miracle?

Gerald‘s wife Yannick and their sons Berlins (14) and Dawens (10) have cleared the US/Haitian bureaucracies and arrived in the US last Thursday and at their new home on Monday.Their family’s story, a harrowing tale, not only teaches us how to build partnerships responsibly,
On Saturday, 50% of Circle Thrift proceeds (all locations) went to Heads Together Haiti, our compassion team that does empowering work both in Fayet. This turned out to be almost $2,000 and will go to helping re-settle the family.
Our compassion team and some friends tried to make this frigid first impression of life in Philadelphia warmer with a care package and some drumming and dancing – check out Julian’s vid here of Gerald & Yannick dancing for joy with Dawn and the drummers. I’m really grateful for my friend to be together with his family. I also am married with two children about their ages. I can barely fathom how it would feel to be separated from my family because of violent desperation for over three years, or the joy of being together again in a new country and climate.

The Circle of Hope Leadership Team talked a bit at last Monday’s Imaginarium about partnering well. Here’s more to the story of how this partnership has worked over the years, and how we hope it will continue.

It was also a Tuesday, six years ago last week that the earthquake hit Haiti. We had already been working with Tetan San (Heads Together) for six months through our compassion team as well as other groups we’re connected to like Haiti Partners. Everyone on our team has been to Haiti, either before or after the quake. Because of Gerald‘s access to money from the US in an impoverished, rural, and now earthquake-torn region, he was abducted by a gang and held for ransom. He knew that staying in Fayet meant paying growing tributes to the gang who held him. The literacy and community organizing, including administrating the school we helped rebuild,  would be considerably compromised. His wife and two sons (then about 8 and 4) fled to a friend’s home in a nearby village.
Not knowing what to do, Gerald fled to Philadelphia in the summer of 2012, where he had a small but dedicated support network – among us. With the trauma and definite threat, he hoped to find a haven for his family and to be able to continue aspects of his community work. While speaking both French and Creole, his English was not great. We needed some creativity to get him to the US as immigration from Haiti is extremely difficult. Refugee status would only protect him. We needed a miracle.
We began a legal process/battle to attain amnesty so his whole family could relocate to Philadelphia, or at least to the US. We invested in legal help and Gerald found ways to work (like Circle Thrift!!) and develop his English language skills. A few months ago, we got the good news that even while many Haitians got temporary extensions of their Temporary Protected Status, Gerald‘s case was permanent and extended to his family. It’s taken more prayer, money, and time to get to this point.
With many thanks to Haiti Partners and the House of Grace Catholic Worker, the family is about to be reunited.
We continue, through Gerald and the rest of the team, to do grassroots work of proliferating possibilities for kids, especially, in Fayet. His heart inspires me. I’m grateful that we can partner with such a dedicated leader. With many other larger forces at work – including political and economic freezing out of Haiti since their independence, we played a role in this story before we got involved directly in 2009 with these folks from Fayet. I’m grateful for the courage of so many to stay involved, pray for miracles, and follow the Holy Spirit as we work out some small solutions to large problems. 
What do we do when we’ve prayed for something for this long that was really unlikely, most would even say not going to actually happen? Can we be grateful? Can our faith be strengthened? Do we dream bigger? I hope we can see God working in the partnership – even in the ups and downs – and feel like we can actually change the world. Jesus wants to. Jesus is.

When Philly Jesus makes real Jesus confusing

Maybe you haven’t heard of Philly Jesus (PJ). Mike Grant found the LORD as he describes as the stone that found me when I was at the bottom. From musical theatre to hip hop, dude has been into public performance for a while and into being a born again Christian lately. Stories differ on how/why this white boy put on the “Jesus jersey” but a following of 11k on Instagram and 3.7k on Twitter and pieces by the BBC point towards people paying attention to his antics.

This morning, he retweeted this Philly.com article that got me thinking more about how not cute I think PJ’s schtick has become. I thought a goofy white dude at Black Lives Matter protests or playing hockey at City Hall was endearing. Just imagining Jesus showing up in Philly is kind of cool. I also think Black Jesus is funny – especially parts with King BachI quickly went from “eh, that’s kind of interesting” to “SMH” for two big reasons. He began a $70k Gofundme campaign so he can buy a fancy car and go on tour to other cities. No doubt connected to likely funders, he went from mooching off of SCOTUS decision celebrations to deleting all his gay friendly posts describing his new rather rugged position against homosexuality (see that Philly.com article).

I think I’m learning:

People have to do a lot of work to take real Jesus seriously. PJ’s antics seemed to have swung people from “Heyo – Jesus is kind of cool” to “Oh, yeah. Christians are judgmental and they want money for fancy cars.” To spend time listening in prayer, studying the Gospel, or devoting your life to the Way of Christ is totally awesome. Did it just become harder to access in Philadelphia?

People will give money to something because it’s funny, because they think it’s cool, but are often challenged to share their heart and wallet with what’s most important to them. I’m grateful to be among so many dedicated partners in Circle of Hope who generously make love happen. I do not take it for granted.

If you want to be a Christian, you represent others with your opinions. If you try to be a public person or persona who claims to be a Christian, you probably represent more people than gave you permission to. Your political profile pics or memes that you share are more than personal expression. Feel the good that goes with being part of the Body and be as generous as you can as the nation processes change.

I talk to people whose only perceptions of Christians are Jimmy Swaggart, George Bush, the Pope, and/or some celebrity like Shia LaBeouf. Drawing closer to the heart of God through being formed into a people with a common purpose might sound more confusing than someone condemning immorality and asking for money to build their special building nowadays. Let’s keep demonstrating what it’s like to find our true selves in Christ. Let’s keep sharing the love that fills us. Let’s keep walking in the way that brings healing, justice, and peace in the land with our Creator who very much wants to keep the Redemption Project going.

 

 

The dress that out trended Trayvon and other things we can’t handle

Last Thursday bunches of my friends were talking/posting about the dress that broke the internet. I think that whole thing was fascinating. It was trending hard and even famous people weighed in on which color combination they saw. The same day, other friends of mine were talking about another “color issue” that wasn’t getting as much buzz in our national consciousness – the third anniversary of Trayvon’s death. The week after he NAILED IT with the Keystone XL veto, Obama was hanging out with Trayvon’s parents to commemorate the anniversary. That’s a nice gesture, but many of us are feeling the Spirit move us to more than sympathy – after all we still don’t know who killed Brandon Tate Brown on Frankford Ave!

Monday the execution of Kelly Gissendaner was postponed for a second time – the first one because of snow and this time because of an issue with the lethal injection pharmacist – supposedly. My friend shared this open letter to Georgia Christians yesterday that has some insight into her story as well as an appeal of putting a limit to the violence. Her case is really wild – and with so many under-represented people of color in the same system, I hope putting off this form of state sanctioned violence is a trend.

Today I read about Brett, the “Soldier of Christ” going back to Iraq with some other Americans vets to join the Assyrian Christian militia to fight ISIS. Not only is he Polish/Irish (yay!) but quotes Matthew 25 in needing to take care of the vulnerable in a day when the US left things worse than how they found them. I admire his courage and commitment, even though I have a different interpretation of how to live out Christ’s directive. Maybe you can feel the tension that I do – at least he’s doing something. It sometimes feels like I’m surrounded by a generation of people who hear about horror stories or know about injustice or oppression (more about it than any generation before) and the only response we can muster is to complain or do internet things.

When we are facing more injustice than we can handle, what do we do? When we are suffering does God care enough to move? At one of Circle of Hope’s meetings last Sunday night someone from my cell brought into our discussion this tension and asked if “God will never give us more than we can handle” is actually in the Bible. A friend who worked as a chaplain was quick with the clarification (1 Corinthians 10:13 – God will not let you be tempted beyond what you can bear. But when you are tempted, God will also provide a way out so you can endure it) as something about keeping our hearts from being set on evil rather than dealing with pain. Tye Tribbett even wrote a song about it.

I’ve heard people tell me that God gave them cancer to teach them something. I heard Ricky Gervais joke on his HBO special that God also gives AIDS to babies in Africa as part of bit about problematic Godviews. I think the advice “God will never give you more than you can handle” might be a useful self-help mantra at times but is probably more of a capitalist “buck up, cowboy” that got attached to the faith. I think that it’s nice to think there are limits to suffering and that Jesus cares about it. Rather than getting tougher, however, I wonder if we can get softer and let God in to care about us. Can we be tender enough to allow Christ’s compassion to move us to heartbreak with others? Can we be open enough to let the Holy Spirit deploy us to work for justice in some rather complex times?

Lent is a good opportunity to explore what we can’t handle. There’s a lot. I think Jesus was finding his limits in the desert, but with the presence of the Holy Spirit. Let’s be honest about those limits, those spaces where we feel the tension with courage and see if God doesn’t move a bunch of us to become a healing agent there.

we need the Prince of Peace

I think a bunch of you are already planning on going to the Shalom House Festival tonight at 2007 Frankford Ave (6:30-8:30, btw-that’s before Lost starts).

Shalom House

Besides dinner and learning more about who Shalom House is (and what they do), there will be time to share experiences about violence.  I hope that you might feel okay sharing your story-whether it turned out well yet or not.   Here’s one of my Philadelphia violence experiences.

The first time I was around 4th & Jefferson (in 1999 for psalters practice), Joey Getz and I went to the corner store for a Sunny D break.  While waiting in line, a man bum rused the cashier, hitting him in the face with the flat end of a pistol.  Everybody (6 or so of us) hit the floor immediately.

My first thought was “I hope he doesn’t rob me, too”-which is kind of embarrassing.  Then I hoped that he didn’t shoot anyone, especially Joey.

The robber left, and as soon as he was gone-so was everyone else in the store-with their items that they no longer were going to purchase.  Without really knowing why, I put back my Sunny D and asked the cashier if he was okay.  He had a trickle of blood coming down from his temple.  He was dialing 911 and said he was fine, and that we didn’t need to wait around as witnesses or anything.

I’m not sure it worked out good, yet.  A few months later several of us began a semi-intentional household at 5th & Girard, including a psalters practice room.  Now I have 10 friends living  less than a full block from the store.

I’m not sure what would be a good end to this story.  I did see Jesus move in towards the hurt and the danger, I saw the casting out of fear as I literally moved closer to where such an event happened.  Sometimes I wonder if I know the guy who did it or have seen him and don’t even know it.

(If that was you, thanks for not shooting anyone that day.  I hope you are in a better place now.  I’d love to meet up sometime and talk if you’re up for it.)

re: definition

Great day with the family, working in the yard and the house.   I am constantly surprised by how wonderful it is to increase the definition of different areas.  When my yard bleeds into one blob, it feels chaotic to be out there.

I get something inside when there are boundaries in the garden.  Different areas for different things.  Places where you don’t walk.  Weeds pulled up and other junk that collects between plants.  It feels so tranquil.

This is not my first post about such things.  But it is the first post about yard work when I thought of a song-not a ton of connection beyond me stealing the title.  This is a great video, too.

Cop:  [To Hi-Tek] “are you deaf?”

Tek:  “nah, he’s Def.”

Mos Def:  “he’s Hi-Tek.”