There war for water is not on the way – it’s already here

I had the honor of participating (and repping Circle of Hope) at the Standing Rock March on Washington last Friday along with Kristen and Joby. The rally that ensued was the most inspired and well-led that I’ve ever attended. One of the main MC’s was 16yr old Xiuhtezcatl Martinez (pronounced Shoe-TEZ-Caht) who youth directs Earth Guardians and lives as a climate change activist and hip hop emcee. He has a TED talk. He typified the vibe of the speakers and musicians, who each shared briefly. Everyone began with gratitude. Most people thanked our Creator and the elders and ancestors who protected the waters for us, inspiring us to protect for those yet to come. 

Last week’s Delaware River Basin Commission’s business meeting was postponed due to inclement weather. I attended the open forum by a member of the commission last month where they heard public comment on new proposals – one a pipeline extension through our watershed and the other a new fracking site – that would bring an end to the hard-won moratorium on fracking. Since then, the commission has not undergone the research they said was needed to make a new decision, although the extraction industry has been hard at work in keeping things quiet and behind the scenes. Even the fracking-induced earthquakes in Pennsylvania haven’t gotten seriously on general consciousness beyond people active in the struggle. When the DRBC reschedules the business meeting, I wonder how many will turn up to keep this voracious practice out of our region?

Less people are in denial than before about a water war coming. Most people imagine this war being carried out by one government on another with the “legitimate” violence of militaries to better the self-interest of one of the nations. I think most people imagine it happening in the future. The war over water has already begun, being waged on us by transnational corporations. The extraction companies, banks and the politicians that they fund are making policies backed by militarized police, private armies, and federal soldiers that creates huge financial gain for a very small number of people while the rest of us pay. The rest of us suffer along with the Earth.

What’s happening at Standing Rock is another example of how settler colonialism continues to rare its ugly head. It’s an old story for Indigenous peoples, one of federal disregard for their lives or ways of life. It’s also new because while they are poisoning the water, they are doing it at our behest. It’s our appetites for cheap gas that keep pipelines expanding. It’s our appetites for thermal comfort, for unrestricted use of fossil fuels in our cars and our homes that make fracking tolerable. We cannot just blame corporations with their private security forces, militarized police, and lawmakers wanting to break treaties by building pipelines or make huge profits on defiling practices like fracking. A few million of us need to take responsibility for our consumption habits and change them.

How does a historic peace church behave during times of war? Some of our Anabaptist cousins lean towards non-involvement. They might pull out of the questionable industries at most levels like the Amish and some Mennonites. Others will only see the people caught up in carrying out the dirty work of the drilling companies because they don’t have other viable economic options, and feel protective of their jobs (thus indirectly protecting the Gas Man). Others, like us, seem to be activating to wage peace during unfriendly times. Waging peace requires personal and communal disciplines as well as contributing to larger strategic work. Jesus will provide for us no matter what we do. Christ’s redeeming work in us doesn’t just help lift burdens of shame and guilt, it empowers us to act in ways that show evidence that we are made fully alive. Let’s make it easier for Jesus and leave some clean water for our grandkids and great grandkids to be able to drink.

When the water protectors at Oceti Sakowin camp were surrounded by police and private military, they chose to burn down their camp and walk out. They weren’t retiring or surrendering, they were proactively changing the battleground. That’s the kind of creative thinking we need right now in our watershed, even as we do our part in the national struggle against the corporations making war on us.

I suggest we act according to our calling by creating more options. We’re in a liminal time, where we are tethered tightly to dirty energy and don’t want to be – yet we don’t know how it will turn out. The Holy Spirit gives us imagination and creativity – especially when we move and act as a body. To fight fracking in our watershed, we need to do more than make legislation that holds off the drillers. We need to explore alternative energy sources and invest as a group in them. We are a living demonstration project. We can dream about what holy limits we need to respect that don’t keep creating more demand for harmful extraction practices. We need to share life – living out God’s good ideas – together, both for accountability to our dreams as well as including more people in the alternative-generation.

 

Holy Week celebrates Exodus from Iron Cages and Freedom from Faith in Powers

While studying at Temple University, John Balzarini taught me about Max Weber (“VAY bur”) and the Iron Cage of Bureaucracy. I bet most of us are unfamiliar that the societal systems of dehumanization we’re so accustomed to ever did NOT exist. It’s normal for us to deal with bureaucracy (that no one seems to like, btw) all the time but since no one seems to be personally responsible we stay irritated and docile. “Just doing my job” is a close second to “just sayin'” in my book of irritating common phrases. Does one mean that since it’s only one’s job, they don’t have any agency to choose human interaction over blind obedience to abstract and unchangeable policy? Whether it’s  talking to an aggressive telemarketer, a Comcast tech support, Eichmann claiming he was solving a math problem, or most governments – at some point we feel that what’s right won’t be done for unimpressive reasoning.

Christian cake makers or fast food cashiers in Indiana have a new law so they don’t have to serve gay people because of religious freedom. Maybe a gnarly church spawned up as an unexpected application of the new legal freedom. Now that there is a law, we don’t have to relate. SEPTA lost a free speech case (they won’t appeal) so they will run anti-Muslim ads on 84 buses starting next week. They changed their policy for the future so no more political messages can be placed, but I doubt they are giving back the $30k to Stop Islamization of America out of protest. The law does not save us, neither does free speech. 

Jesus violates bureaucratic ties between religion and state – especially the economics when he thrashes an area of the Temple where non-Jews were allowed. In that area, exploitation of a rule to not use empire’s currency for worship was permitted. Someone asked me one time whether ArtShop was like that (holding a market of 50+ local artists in the building we use also for worship) or offering our music for donation was sort of like that because they heard megachurches have gift shops with lattes and dvds of the meeting you just watched. I think we are wise to be suspicious of weird practices of churches – but let’s also watch out for companies who make a buck off of your generosity. I am more suspicious of PayPal, who takes 3% of those electronic donations you might make to the church. Square Reader takes a little less, but was a big compromise for us to make available (cash, check, or Bill Pay cuts out the e-money changers on that gift).

Sometimes the law helps. 150 people (including a few from Circle of Hope) were in the Caucus Room at City Hall today for the release of the Philadelphia Coalition for Affordable Communities’s new report: “Development Without Displacement: Keeping Communities Strong.” This coalition work has been going for almost a decade and helping Philadelphia to become the largest city to adopt a Land Bank might be some good fruit, the joy of connecting and working together will outlive any legislation. We all have certain bugaboos about laws or lack thereof – like the US Immigration Policy that just deported a Mennonite Pastor or Fracking in PA. Even with better legal stuff, even if everyone had everything they needed – would that kind of law save us? 

I don’t think it’s wrong or a waste to pursue justice together – often that’s opposing unjust laws and practices of the powerful. There is more to justice that just-sounding laws. Even if fracking was illegal in PA, we still have a limitless appetite for cheap fuel so we’d allow another practice that was potentially as dangerous to life – just not so close to home. The work needs to go down to a community level and even a heart level. I follow the Way of Jesus that frees us from faith in the Powers – the same Powers that will continue to perpetrate systems that dehumanize us and commoditize creation in one way or another. To escape from the Iron Cage is not merely awareness or personal holiness – we need to co-author with Jesus an embodiment of his world redemption project that began long ago. The social locus of this movement gets revealed during Holy Week. Don’t miss the story, it’s being written again through us.

Brake for Peace/Break for Peace

Sometimes the phrase “be careful what you wish for” rings eerily true. I have been praying, especially over the past two years to have a groundswell of acting for racial justice as well as taking our call to peace to the next level. I wasn’t hoping for disasters to occasion such an uprising, but I’m grateful we have an opportunity to contribute to a large movement. As security forces have been avoiding indictment over the needless deaths of Mike Brown and Eric Garner, the masses have been answering with words and deeds across the nation.

#BlackLivesMatter, #StayWokeAdvent, #JusticeForMikeBrown, and #ICantBreathe have been lighting up social media as a compliment to inspiring protests, actions, prayer, worship, marches, and other ways of standing up. I think this month more of us need to BRAKE for peace like all these die-ins are teaching us. The highway stops because Shalom is broken and we all need to turn to the Prince of Peace and work at restoring God’s Shalom. Braking for peace is about listening, learning, empathizing, and prayerfully receiving from Jesus. It is about being.

We also need the doing during Advent. We need to BREAK for peace by getting out from behind the screens and into real relationships and activity. We need to break free from the lies that teach us that people outside your family are not connected to you, that God’s image does not extend beyond your racial assignment, and that by standing up against unjust systems is demonizing people. Peace is not made by just being tolerant – it is made by changing our minds about our relatedness and our actions to demonstrate it.

In and around Circle of Hope over the next few weeks there are so many chances to get more info, hear stories, get touched by God, ask questions, and make decisions about how we will respond together led by the Holy Spirit. If you can add to this list in the comments, I’d be grateful. I’ll offer an italicized prayer after each event that I suggest.

Tonight – Conversations for Peace in Palestine & Israel. Daryl Byler (of MCCand EMU) will be offering personal accounts, wisdom, and hope. 7pm at 1125 S. Broad. Let Christ’s peace extend further than the global military industrial complex. 

Saturday – Peace on Earth and the Politics of Christmas. 9:30am at 1515 Fairmount with the Alternative Seminary’s Will O’Brien and a host of other inspiring theological activists (including musicians from three Circle of Hope congregations) from Philadelphia. Let the coming of God With Us renew our hearts, minds, as well as feet & hands.

Monday – Doing Theology – this time we consider what it means to stand with Ferguson, 7pm 1125 S. Broad. Give us the courage to come to you with our doubts & fears, open for your direction.

Tuesday – Come hear a Report Back from CPT delegates who recently returned from Iraqi Kurdistan (war on terror, ISIS) and NW Ontario (indigenous resistance to the extraction industry), 7pm 2007 Frankford. Help us to connect the dots of domination and hear the groans of our mother.

Saturday 12/28 (plan still forming) – Liturgy and demonstration at the site of the future Drone Command Center in Horsham, PA (very positive article on Fox about how many jobs it will create here). Make us more human in the face of mechanized, weaponized, inhumane methods of killing.