“finally”

Today I had my 2 finals, officially marking the end of the semester!  whew!  In some ways I now know why it took me so long to get back in college, in other ways I’m really siked to be taking classes.  It’s not always easy, but it’s really stimulating and deepening.  I definitely felt like an “adult student” today when I was really pumped to write an essay for 2 hours for my final in History of Southern Africa (thanks, Teshale!).  The question was to state Steve Biko’s ideology of Black Consciousness and his critique of White liberalism.  It was a treat to sit for that time with Mr. Biko and reflect on his inspiring writings and life.

Steve Biko, 1946-1977

Steve Biko, 1946-1977

It’s going to be nice not having to go to class or do all that reading, at least until late January.  Next semester I set up my schedule way better and have equally cool classes so it won’t be as wild as this one.

Remember, remember

The twelfth of September

A light, once bright was dimmed.

Have you forgotten?

Have you forgotten? by Darryl Worley.  I was singing this to some friends the other day and they didn’t believe me that it was a real song, or that it was a #1 hit in 2003.

official video here.

It feels almost indulgent to listen to it.  So rich with the ideology that we are so surrounded by that even people in the resistance don’t often know how to respond.  Here’s the first verse and chorus…

I hear people sayin’. We Don’t need this war.
I say there’s some things worth fightin’ for.
What about our freedom, and this piece of ground?
We didn’t get to keep ’em by backin’ down.
They say we don’t realize the mess we’re gettin’ in
Before you start preachin’ let me ask you this my friend.

if I were reading this for the first time I would have naturally assumed that it was written by Zulu in South Africa or Lakotah in the North American midwest.  So fighting in Afghanistan is actually about fighting for Tennessee?  If anyone questions us about the long-term ramifications about the proposed perpetual pre-emptive war in response to 911 we should then reply with the following?

Chorus
Have you forgotten, how it felt that day?
To see your homeland under fire
And her people blown away
Have you forgotten, when those towers fell
We had neighbors still inside goin through a livin hell
And you say we shouldn’t worry bout Bin Laden
Have you forgotten?

Wow.  Rest of lyrics here.  Wow.

State Theology

While finishing up my second book for my History of Southern Africa class, Jesus has been mentioned quite a bit.  Since the beginning of the class, there has been the all-too-familiar notions of those in power using their concepts of God to justify not only their superior social status, exploitation of others, but their ideology of “this is the way it is”.  Notably the Afrikaners using a military victory over the Zulu in the Battle of Blood River (the Ncome River) on Dec 16, 1838 as proof that God prefers the European newcomers over the African inhabitants.

It took some theological unraveling for people to get the idea out of their heads that the State (no matter which one) was ordained by God-to be obeyed and if you rebel against them you are rebelling against God.

A Christian Dirce by Henryk Siemiradzki

I have had hundreds of conversation in my day about how to work with this excerpt from Romans 13 (when Nero was likely emperor) and how to make sense of it-mostly in the modern USA context. Responding to the same rhetoric that we hear in the States about how we are to go along with the governments and how military victories perpetuate our freedom, The Kairos Document was drafted in 1985 by over 150 clergy of all races and denominations.  They helpfully outlined how crazy such arguments to justify the oppressor are.

Continue reading

first day of class

I just posted at Circle of Hope about being the new kid on campus.  I am experiencing at the moment a combination of “my class was let out after 20min” and a ton of new stimulation so I thought I’d post here, too.  I’m trying not to x-post anymore, we’ll see how long I keep it up.

I bought my first book for class already,  The History of South Africa by Leonard Thompson.  It’s for my History of Southern Africa course.  Pretty decent already.  Within the first 5min the prof had mentioned apartheid and white liberalism developing into paternalism-boom boom boom.

In about an hour I get my fist class with John Balz, not only my prof 3 days a week, but my left fielder on Friday nights!

If you see me around campus, don’t be afraid to tell me where to find free stuff or where the library is.