Signing The Declaration as a team during 911 and UNDRIP anniversaries

I love being part of the Circle of Hope pastors and staff team. We’ve grown and changed over the years and continue to hold to what holds us together, love. Since its release last Tuesday, our team of pastors and staff have signed the Theological Declaration on Christian Faith and White Supremacy out of love for Jesus, one another, for the church, the victims of unjust systems, and for those caught up in these deceitful ideologies.

I hope that you have caught wind of The Declaration by now. One of my mentors, Randy Woodley, became an instrumental figure in drafting this theological and practical response for Christians in the midst of overt white supremacy and white nationalism in our communities. He personally invited me to partake in this move, inspired by the Barmen Declaration of 1934 by Christians in Germany who opposed the harmful influence of Christians adopting Nazi ideals and infecting and misshaping the Church.

When Unite the Right gathered in Charlottesville a few weeks ago, a long, sick story added a new iconic chapter. Since 11/9 (the last US federal election), white supremacy has been emboldened and become more overt. Many Christians in the US have fallen prey to norms and ideals that contradict the Good News of Christ. #theDeclaration isn’t just about pointing out the speck in our proverbial brother’s eye, it is a tool “to acknowledge and repent of the church’s complicity in perpetuating white male supremacy in all of its forms and to hear and to heed the call to return to the truth of scripture, fully revealed in the person of Jesus.”

As a continuing expression of the Anabaptist movement, we don’t all think that making statements to the Powers That Be or to those not part of the covenanted community is essential to what the church is given to do. We form alternative community to the domination system, participating in the cultivation of God’s harmonious reign slowly and together. One of our main partners, MCC, released a potent Statement on White Supremacy and Racism last month.

911 and UNDRIP anniversaries give us tangible reminders of work to be done

September 11, 2001 (remember to never forget, btw) often gets memorialized with loss, grief, and a promise that unity under the US American government will make everyone safer from violence, through violence. We would like to forget (or not learn) that the death toll for the War on Terror has grown into the millions. On that anniversary, I still resonate with what Terry Rockefeller of September 11 Families for Peaceful Tomorrows shared at Jesus, Bombs, and Ice Cream, “There can be no war on terror. War is terror.

After 25 years of organizing, we can celebrate today the 10th anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People. The US, of course, was with the main settler colonial states of Australia, Canada, and New Zealand to oppose the landmark victory. Former President Obama officially lent US support to the declaration in 2010. Along with over 560 federally recognized Indian tribes, over 60 state recognized tribes, and countless other native relatives in the US—we’re still waiting for action.

Signing the Declaration isn’t just word, it comes with action.In response to these truths and in rejection of these false doctrines, we implore people of Christian faith to match confession with repentance. Let us find new ways to be together in the world. We offer four actions we might take toward the healing of our nation:” to listen, lament, repent, and re-imagine. I’m grateful that Circle of Hope has been a space where these practices are part of our rhythms of life and path of discipleship. I hope that more of our siblings in Christ can be present to our moment in time, and the Holy Spirit’s power and direction to healthy and authentic expressions of life in Christ. I hope more Christians will sign and implement the Declaration. I hope more people will be freed up to join in Jesus’ world redemption project.