There war for water is not on the way – it’s already here

I had the honor of participating (and repping Circle of Hope) at the Standing Rock March on Washington last Friday along with Kristen and Joby. The rally that ensued was the most inspired and well-led that I’ve ever attended. One of the main MC’s was 16yr old Xiuhtezcatl Martinez (pronounced Shoe-TEZ-Caht) who youth directs Earth Guardians and lives as a climate change activist and hip hop emcee. He has a TED talk. He typified the vibe of the speakers and musicians, who each shared briefly. Everyone began with gratitude. Most people thanked our Creator and the elders and ancestors who protected the waters for us, inspiring us to protect for those yet to come. 

Last week’s Delaware River Basin Commission’s business meeting was postponed due to inclement weather. I attended the open forum by a member of the commission last month where they heard public comment on new proposals – one a pipeline extension through our watershed and the other a new fracking site – that would bring an end to the hard-won moratorium on fracking. Since then, the commission has not undergone the research they said was needed to make a new decision, although the extraction industry has been hard at work in keeping things quiet and behind the scenes. Even the fracking-induced earthquakes in Pennsylvania haven’t gotten seriously on general consciousness beyond people active in the struggle. When the DRBC reschedules the business meeting, I wonder how many will turn up to keep this voracious practice out of our region?

Less people are in denial than before about a water war coming. Most people imagine this war being carried out by one government on another with the “legitimate” violence of militaries to better the self-interest of one of the nations. I think most people imagine it happening in the future. The war over water has already begun, being waged on us by transnational corporations. The extraction companies, banks and the politicians that they fund are making policies backed by militarized police, private armies, and federal soldiers that creates huge financial gain for a very small number of people while the rest of us pay. The rest of us suffer along with the Earth.

What’s happening at Standing Rock is another example of how settler colonialism continues to rare its ugly head. It’s an old story for Indigenous peoples, one of federal disregard for their lives or ways of life. It’s also new because while they are poisoning the water, they are doing it at our behest. It’s our appetites for cheap gas that keep pipelines expanding. It’s our appetites for thermal comfort, for unrestricted use of fossil fuels in our cars and our homes that make fracking tolerable. We cannot just blame corporations with their private security forces, militarized police, and lawmakers wanting to break treaties by building pipelines or make huge profits on defiling practices like fracking. A few million of us need to take responsibility for our consumption habits and change them.

How does a historic peace church behave during times of war? Some of our Anabaptist cousins lean towards non-involvement. They might pull out of the questionable industries at most levels like the Amish and some Mennonites. Others will only see the people caught up in carrying out the dirty work of the drilling companies because they don’t have other viable economic options, and feel protective of their jobs (thus indirectly protecting the Gas Man). Others, like us, seem to be activating to wage peace during unfriendly times. Waging peace requires personal and communal disciplines as well as contributing to larger strategic work. Jesus will provide for us no matter what we do. Christ’s redeeming work in us doesn’t just help lift burdens of shame and guilt, it empowers us to act in ways that show evidence that we are made fully alive. Let’s make it easier for Jesus and leave some clean water for our grandkids and great grandkids to be able to drink.

When the water protectors at Oceti Sakowin camp were surrounded by police and private military, they chose to burn down their camp and walk out. They weren’t retiring or surrendering, they were proactively changing the battleground. That’s the kind of creative thinking we need right now in our watershed, even as we do our part in the national struggle against the corporations making war on us.

I suggest we act according to our calling by creating more options. We’re in a liminal time, where we are tethered tightly to dirty energy and don’t want to be – yet we don’t know how it will turn out. The Holy Spirit gives us imagination and creativity – especially when we move and act as a body. To fight fracking in our watershed, we need to do more than make legislation that holds off the drillers. We need to explore alternative energy sources and invest as a group in them. We are a living demonstration project. We can dream about what holy limits we need to respect that don’t keep creating more demand for harmful extraction practices. We need to share life – living out God’s good ideas – together, both for accountability to our dreams as well as including more people in the alternative-generation.

 

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